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1927 Map of the Arboretum

2016: Hunnewell Intern New Hampshire Expedition

Exploring the woods around Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire. Hunnewell Interns Jordan Morgan and Adam Beck scout for lowbush blueberries (Vacccinium angustifolium). Natalie Buckley-Medrano, 2016.
Exploring the woods around Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire. Hunnewell Interns Jordan Morgan and Adam Beck scout for lowbush blueberries (Vacccinium angustifolium).

Plants collected on this Expedition

Plant ID Accession Date Recieved As Origin Source

Expedition Stats

New Hampshire

Event Type
Expedition
Collection Type
Germplasm, Herbarium Specimens
Arnold Arboretum Participants
Adam Banks, Adam Beck, Natalie Buckley-Medrano, Giovani Camargo, Wyatt Dixon, Robert Dowell, Andrew Gapinski, Jordan Morgan, Connor Ryan, and Jenna Zukswert
Common wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis) grows in abundance in northern New England.
Common wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis) grows in abundance in northern New England. Natalie Buckley-Medrano, 2016.
East Pond, a kettle pond at the foot of Mount Osceola, Grafton County, New Hampshire, served as our first collection location of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides).
East Pond, a kettle pond at the foot of Mount Osceola, Grafton County, New Hampshire, served as our first collection location of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides). Natalie Buckley-Medrano, 2016.

In June 2016, the Isabella Welles Hunnewell Interns made a plant collecting expedition to the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire. This weekend trip not only yielded collections, but was a wonderful training experience for the young horticulturists.

The interns tested their plant identification skills in the field while searching for the five target taxa Taxon: In biology, a taxon (plural taxa) is a group of one or more populations of an organism or organisms seen by taxonomists to form a unit. on the desiderata list. They gained valuable understanding of the importance of detailed documentation, and learned how to properly gather herbarium vouchers Herbarium specimen: An herbarium specimen is a pressed and dried plant sample that is generally mounted on a sheet of paper. Specimens can be stored indefinitely and are used for a wide variety of botanical research. and plant material destined for the Arboretum’s living collections.

Their desiderata list included five species native to the northeastern forests: wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis), black ash (Fraxinus nigra), bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata), quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), and lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium).

The team camped in the southern edge of the White Mountain National Forest near Lincoln, NH, over the weekend of June 10-12. This location provided a convenient jumping off point for their daily excursions in search of there target taxa. During their busy days, they ventured through habitats that ranged from the upland forests near the foot of Mount Osceola to find quaking aspens, to the wetlands near Bethlehem to find specimens of black ash.

The productive trip yielded accessions from all five of their targets. They found three specimens of wild sarsaparilla, four bigtooth aspens, four quaking aspens, one black ash, and one example of a lowbush blueberry. Of these collections, three sarsaparillas (accession 583-2016*A), three bigtooth aspens (accessions 588-2016*A, 589-2016*A, and 590-2016*A), two quaking aspens (accessions 582-2016*A and 586-2016*A), and two lowbush blueberries (accessions 593-2016*A and *B) have found homes on the grounds.

The Collecting Team

Team members included 2016 Hunnewell Interns Adam Banks, Adam Beck, Natalie Buckley-Medrano Giovani Camargo, Wyatt Dixon, Jordan Morgan, and Connor Ryan; Living Collections Fellows Robert Dowell and Jenna Zukswert; and Manager of Horticulture Andrew Gapinski.

Hunnewell Interns learn how to prepare a herbarium voucher specimen, here of quaking aspen(Populus tremuloides).
A common associate of many of the taxa observed was another Campaign Desiderata species, creeping dogwood (Cornus canadensis).
Pinkham Notch, Coos County, New Hampshire, at the foot of Mount Washington, is New England’s tallest peak at 6,288 feet (1,917 meters) above sea level.
Camping in the north woods of New Hampshire offered a fun and unique collecting experience for Hunnewell Interns.